premise / premises

premise / premises
   A premise usually means "assumption": Since the basic premise was wrong, all the conclusions based on it were wrong, too.
   Premises are a house or building and the grounds around it: Smoking is not allowed on the premises.

Confused words. 2014.

Игры ⚽ Нужен реферат?

Look at other dictionaries:

  • premise / premises —    A premise usually means assumption : Since the basic premise was wrong, all the conclusions based on it were wrong, too.    Premises are a house or building and the grounds around it: Smoking is not allowed on the premises …   Confused words

  • Premises — For other uses, see Premise Premises are land and buildings together considered as a property. This usage arose from property owners finding the word in their title deeds, where it originally correctly meant the aforementioned; what this document …   Wikipedia

  • Premise — Prem ise, n.; pl. {Premises}. [Written also, less properly, {premiss}.] [F. pr[ e]misse, fr. L. praemissus, p. p. of praemittere to send before; prae before + mittere to send. See {Mission}.] 1. A proposition antecedently supposed or proved;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • premise — premise, premiss A premiss (usually pronounced prem is) or (rarely) premise is a previous statement from which another is inferred; the plural is premisses or premises. In the plural, premises also means ‘a house or building with its grounds’. As …   Modern English usage

  • Premises — Premise Prem ise, n.; pl. {Premises}. [Written also, less properly, {premiss}.] [F. pr[ e]misse, fr. L. praemissus, p. p. of praemittere to send before; prae before + mittere to send. See {Mission}.] 1. A proposition antecedently supposed or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Premise — Pre*mise , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Premised}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Premising}.] [From L. praemissus, p. p., or E. premise, n. See {Premise}, n.] 1. To send before the time, or beforehand; hence, to cause to be before something else; to employ previously …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Premise (disambiguation) — Premise (from the Latin praemissa propositio , meaning placed in front ) can refer to:* Premise, a claim that is a reason for, or an objection against, some other claim as part of an argument * Premises, land and buildings together considered as… …   Wikipedia

  • premises — building and grounds, 1730; see PREMISE (Cf. premise) …   Etymology dictionary

  • premise — [prem′is; ] for v., chiefly Brit [ pri mīz′] n. [ME premisse < ML praemissa < L praemissus, pp. of praemittere, to send before < prae , before + mittere, to send: see PRE & MISSION] 1. a) a previous statement or assertion that serves as… …   English World dictionary

  • premises — premise …   Philosophy dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”